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2nd International
Nursing Conference

November 1-3, 2017 | Barcelona, Spain

Program Schedule

  • Sessions:
    Nursing education

    Time:

    Title: A Mentoring program for licensure success

    Deborah Zbegner
    Wilkes University, USA

    Biography
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    Biography

    Deborah Zbegner
    Wilkes University, USA



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Deborah Zbegner
    Wilkes University, USA

    Background: In the United States, successful completion of the licensure exam has become synonymous with the quality of educational preparation received by students in baccalaureate programs. Pass rate serves as a key indicator of the achievement of a programs academic goals and it is incorporated into state board approval and the accreditation process of programs. The licensure exam provided in the United States for entry into practice as a registered nurse is the National Council of State Boards of Nursing Licensure Exam (NCLEX-RN). Program: In order to improve upon the programs pass rates, a comprehensive mentorship program was instituted. Mentoring in academia has been reported as an effective way to increase self-confidence and promote professional development. Based on the parent universitys mentoring model, the School of Nursing used gaming strategies, content reviews, computerized integrative testing and learning packages, to assist students preparing for the licensure exam. Faculty team leaders were assigned to oversee and coordinate student learning. Groups of eight to nine students were assigned to each team. This program is implemented with senior students who must achieve a specific pass rate on their comprehensive predictor exam and meet a specific masterly level score on their computerized NCLEX style questions before graduation. Results: The Comprehensive Mentoring Program has been implemented over a three year period of time and modified for improvement annually. A variety of data points were used to assess prediction of NCLEX-RN success as defined by first-time pass rate. Pass rates have improved each year from baseline of 79.17% in 2014, to 83.82% in 2015, and 90.14% in 2016. Logistic regression analysis revealed that overall college grade point average (p = .002) and a comprehensive exam in the NCLEX-RN format (p = .001) were significant predictors of NCLEX-RN success.

    Time:

    Title: The effects of theory-based simulation design on clinical nursing judgment development

    Joyce Victor
    Wilkes University, USA

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    Biography

    Joyce Victor
    Wilkes University, USA

    Joyce Victor,Phd, RN-BC, CHSE-A, is a graduate of NPR-Pittston School of nursing. She has a bachelor and MSN, MHA, and MA in Creative Writing from Wilkes University. She earned her PhD from Duquesne University School of Nursing, where her dissertation on a theoretical model for simulation design won the outstanding dissertation award. She is coauthor of the International Standards of Best Practice for Simulation: Design, published by the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Nursing (INACSL). Victor-Chmil has been the Director of the Clinical and Simulation-Based Learning at the Passan School of Nursing at Wilkes University for the past thirteen years. She has been active in the American Heart Association on the local and state level. She is Regional Faculty for AHA BCLS, ACLS, and PALS programs and has served as National Faculty for ACLS for two terms. She is board certified in Professional Development through ANCC. She holds advanced certification as a Healthcare Simulation Educator (CHSE-A) through the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH). Her research trajectory focuses on how academic programs prepare pre-licensure nursing students for entry into practice.



    Abstract

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    Title: Nurse educators are faced with challenges in carrying out research in the global arena

    G. Elaine Patterson
    Ramapo College Of New Jersey, USA

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    Biography

    G. Elaine Patterson
    Ramapo College Of New Jersey, USA



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    Abstract

    G. Elaine Patterson
    Ramapo College Of New Jersey, USA

    Abstract Content:Study protocols in some countries often lack the rigors of established standards of ethical research. This paper provides some strategies for nurses intending to carryout research globally where an IRB may or may not be in place. Researchers involved in international research must commit to maintaining rigor and ethics. The international center for nursing ethics , (ICNE).lends guidance to these nurses. Researchers are reminded to always adhere to broad general principles of research including respect for person, beneficence, justice, and contextual caring. Preparing: prior to carrying out any study the researcher should (a) ensure that there is an ethical viable reason for carrying out the study, (b) involve the community of interes in the design of the study (c) and identify who in the community will benefit most from the study. Challenges: carrying out research in a foreign country is not without challenges. Researchers will do well to anticipate some misunderstanding between the local community and the researcher. There may be limited resources, inability to sustain long term involvement, limited technical capacity, inability to obtain consents, and concerns of the locals about exploitation in the use of the data. Summary: Engaging nurses from the communitywill garner cooperation from subjects andin gaining overall support for the study being done. It is the community leaders who will identify where the needs are, the uniqueness of the situation, assist in disseminating the information about the study, and obtaining consents. Community workers will also be the ones to help maintain confidentiality during the study and disseminate the findings afterwards.

    Time:

    Title: Service learning: Expanding community partnerships and student learning

    Emily Havrilla
    Wilkes University, USA

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    Biography

    Emily Havrilla
    Wilkes University, USA



    Abstract

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    Title: Importance of nurses knowledge of delirium in the intensive care unit

    Juliana Mwose
    Saint Marys College, USA

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    Biography

    Juliana Mwose
    Saint Marys College, USA

    Dr. Juliana Mwose is a critical care nurse by background. She currently teaches both graduate and undergraduate nursing students at Saint Mary's College at Notre Dame, Indiana, USA. Dr. Mwose also holds an advanced practice position with a Pulmonary and Critical Care Associates group where she manages patients with pulmonary diseases. From the day Dr. Mwose entered nursing school, she knew critical care was the areas she was interested in working in. She served as a critical care bedside nurse for 13 years both in acute care and in Long Term Acute Care (LTAC), before joining Pulmonary & Critical Care Associates as an advanced practice nurse. Dr. Juliana Mwose attained her undergraduate nursing degree from Indiana University of South Bend, Indiana, USA, Masters degree from Indiana University/Purdue University of Indianapolis with a concentration on Adult health. She proceeded to attain a Doctor of Nursing degree from Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana, US. In the community, Dr. Mwose has presented on the subject of delirium in the ICU, of which she states that delirium continue to be a major problem especially in the ICU and there remains an opportunity for healthcare providers to improve the care of the ICU patient with regard to delirium.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Juliana Mwose
    Saint Marys College, USA

    Delirium is an acute central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, with accompanying change in cognition,characterized by a disturbance of consciousness resulting from any number of common insults that intensive care unit (ICU)patients experience. It is the brain's form of "organ dysfunction."Delirium typically manifests as a constellation of symptoms with an acute onset and a fluctuating course. Delirium is extremely common in the intensive care unit (ICU) especially amongst mechanically ventilated patients. Intensive care nurses must be trained to identify and manage delirium accurately. In the (ICU) patient, delirium occurs due to factors such as comorbidity, critical illness, and iatrogenesis. These complications of hospital stay are extremely hazardous in older persons and is associated with increased length of stay, institutionalization, and death. Neurologic dysfunction compromises patients' ability to be weaned from mechanical ventilation or achieve full recovery and independence. Yet ICU nurses are usually unaware of the presence of different types of delirium and often times, only recognize this disturbance in agitated patients (hyperactive delirium). There are various delirium assessment tools. Although the CAM-ICU is the most widely studied and validated diagnostic instrument, the accuracy of this tool may be less than ideal without adequate training of the nurses applying it. The presentation will review the definition and salient features of delirium, its primary risk factors, and review validated instrumentsfor delirium assessment that have been developed for ICU nurses, and interventions to be used in delirium management in the ICU. Keywords: Delirium, Critical illness, Coma, Sedatives, Antipsychotics

    Time:

    Title: Use of storytelling and curve balls in preclinical nursing education

    Chris Calucci Bacchi
    Dominican University of California, USA

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    Biography

    Chris Calucci Bacchi
    Dominican University of California, USA

    Chris Carlucci Bacchi brings a wealth of knowledge, skills, and experience to her passion for health care education. Areas of focus include pathophysiology, assessment, and simulation. She received her M.D. from The University of California, San Francisco, M.S. from The University of California, Berkeley, a Certificate in Bioethics from Cambridge University, and her B.S.N. from The Catholic University of America. Dr. Bacchi completed residency at Stanford University. She has spent the last twelve years as an instructor at Dominican University of California. Her expertise in both nursing and medicine offers a unique perspective in communicating new material to novice students.



    Abstract

    Time:

    Title: Traditional vs. Flipped: A study of two teaching methodologies

    Annette Peacock Johnson
    Saint Marys College, USA

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    Biography

    Annette Peacock Johnson
    Saint Marys College, USA



    Abstract

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    Title: Assessing clinical decision making

    Mary Wcisel
    Saint Marys College, USA

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    Biography

    Mary Wcisel
    Saint Marys College, USA

    Mary Wcisel has a clinical background in medical-surgical nursing. She has been an educator in nursing for the past 34 years. She has taught nursing to associate degree students. For the past 16 years she has taught a senior level advanced medical surgical nursing course to baccalaureate students at Saint Mary's College, in Notre Dame, Indiana.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Mary Wcisel
    Saint Marys College, USA

    One purpose of the nursing clinical is to provide an opportunity for students to apply the concepts learned in the classroom. For nursing educators, it is challenging to assess a students learning in the fast paced clinical environment. How do we assess that students are actively involved in learning? More importantly, how do we identify that students are making the appropriate relationships between concepts? How do we assess that students are identifying the appropriate data to support or not support a clinical problem? In a senior level advanced medical-surgical course, students are required to conduct an individual clinical conference with faculty. During the conference, the student discusses the patients current medical/surgical condition. Clinical decision-making is fostered by asking the student to discuss the patients current or potential complication, the data that would support the complication, and what the student would do to prevent and/or treat the complication. Students feedback on the clinical conference has been very positive. They frequently comment on how much they learned and how the conferences helped them put all the pieces together. In addition, faculty are able to assess the strengths and limitations to the students decision making. This presentation will discuss the benefits and challenges of individual clinical conferences to promote clinical decision-making.

    Time:

    Title: Intraprofessional collaborativecare practice model in primary care

    Linda Omondi
    Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, USA

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    Biography

    Linda Omondi
    Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, USA

    Redesigning the primary care system in America has become a national priority as the United States (US) struggles to solve issues of poor access, high cost, and suboptimal quality. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently highlighted the critical role that nurses will play in this redesign (IOM, 2011). Increasingly the delivery of primary health care depends on the contributions of various team members that represent different disciplines. It may be assumed that bringing together different health providers will make a team. But an effective team must develop over time.Our practice, a nurse-led Advanced Practice Nurse clinic, is in year two of a three-yearpilot program for an Intraprofessional Collaborative Care Practice (IPCP) /Education Model with the central core of the model being the role of a Nurse Patient Advocate (NPA). The disciplines represented are nursing, pharmacy, dental, and social work--as well as nonclinical staff. The NPA coordinates patient-centered team-based primary care. Based on the experiences in the pilot program; review of the literature; and expert input, challenges were identified. Our experiences revealed team conflict which included: role boundary issues; scope of practice, and a lack of understanding of how the role of the Nurse Patient Advocate could be effective as the core member of the team. Exploration of the role of the NPA in the IPCP, evaluation of the program over the last two years, guided the development of strategies for resolving team conflict and communication barriers to ensure the delivery of a team-based approach to patient centered care. Interprofessional Collaborative Care Practice Models improves care by increasing the coordination of services.



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    Linda Omondi
    Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, USA

    Time:

    Title: The development of assertion reason questions (ARQ's) for the assessment of level 7 graduate entry nurses

    Devi Nannen
    University of York, United Kingdom

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    Biography

    Devi Nannen
    University of York, United Kingdom

    Devi is currently a lecturer in the adult field of nursing at the University of York in the United Kingdom, previously a lecturer at Universityof Nottingham. Devi contributes to the undergraduate, post-graduate and CPD modules. Devi also holds the role of Deputy Chair to the Board of Examiners and Chair of the Equality and Diversity Committee. Having trained in South Africa, Devi has varied experiences in nursing from medical, surgical, A&E, Intensive care and clinical education. Devi has worked nationally and internationally (Saudi Arabia).Devis main clinical experience is in cardiac Intensive Care where she obtained a Specialist Practitioner Qualification (Critical Care) and became an ECMO specialist.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Devi Nannen
    University of York, United Kingdom

    In order to make safe and sound decisions in a fast-changing and unpredictable clinical practice environment, nurses need knowledge that has a solid theoretical foundation, which is situationally relevant and clinically appropriate. Describing this as functioning knowledge, Biggs (2003) argues that it can only be acquired through a deep approach to learning and not a surface one. The need for nursing students to adopt a deep approach is therefore obvious. Graduate Entry Nursing Programmes pose a challenge at assessing students at Level 7 on their understanding, application and reasoning of theoretical knowledge. Multiple Choice Questions are only able to assess the retention of factual knowledge and therefore not appropriate for post-graduate education. By contrast, Assertion Reason Questions(ARQs) allow the student to demonstrate high order thinking and thus a deeper level of understanding. This session aims to provide attendees with a reflection on the development of ARQs that were fit for practice, addressed university assessment guidelines, and assessed module content in a balanced way. The session will provide an oral presentation on how to develop an ARQ along with the rationale for their use.

    Time:

    Title: Preparing novice nursing students to becoming lifelong researchers

    Esther Christian Sellars
    The University of Tennessee at Martin, USA

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    Biography

    Esther Christian Sellars
    The University of Tennessee at Martin, USA

    Esther Christian Sellars is a professor at the University of Tennessee Martin in USA. She is currently a faculty advisor for Pi Tau Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau. She was completed her Ed.D. - University of Memphis, Memphis, TN; Education 2003, MSN-Ark. State University. Jonesboro, Ark.; Nursing 1997 BSN-University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; Little Rock, Ark; Nursing 1989. She gave many presentations like International Rural Health Congress; New York-Using Newman System Theory in a Rural Setting; National Rural Health Association Convention-Newman System Theory: Students View.



    Abstract

    Time:

    Title: Tale of two cities: East meets West: - Culturally competent instruction beyond geographical boundaries in India and USA

    Jackie L. Michael
    University of Texas at Arlington, USA

    Biography

    Abstract

    Time:

    Title: Teaching and learning about palliative care in singapore: The influence of culture in shaping end of life care experiences

    John Costello
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom

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    Biography

    John Costello
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    John Costello
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom

    Background: Palliative care is an emerging specialist area of nursing in Asia. In Singapore very few nurses prior to and after registration have any clinical experience of working in palliative care settings and there is a paucity of research data. There is a need to develop a better understanding of the principles and practice of palliative care in a culture which stigmatizes death and dying. Aim: This study explored student perceptions of palliative care after undertaking a short preparatory module and undertaking a 2 week clinical placement in Singapore. Design: A qualitative design using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Settings: A Singaporean Polytechnic Participants: Twenty four students undertaking a full time two year degree programme in nursing practice provided by the University of Manchester in collaboration with Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT). Methods: Face-to-face individual semi-structured interviews focused on student experiences of palliative care.Interview questions were informed by the teaching and learning assessment document used to achieve practice assessment objectives. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim and meaningful termswere coded and categorized into themes. Findings: The findings highlighted 3 main themes:Apprehension about collusion practices, lack of self-confidence about palliative care knowledge and anxiety about communication skills. Conclusion and implications The findings revealed the role that local culture plays in shaping individual and institutional attitudes and practices toward death and dying. Moreover, there are implications for the management of clinical practice for students beyond Singapore in terms of the provision of appropriate clinical support to supplement standard preparation currently provided for palliative care modules. Key Words:Teaching Learning, Palliative care, Culture

    Time:

    Title: Transforming Perspective on older adults: Conceptualizing the Silver Tsunami as a cultural paradigm shift.

    Katheryn Fernandez
    Mount Carmel College of Nursing

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    Biography

    Katheryn Fernandez
    Mount Carmel College of Nursing



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Katheryn Fernandez
    Mount Carmel College of Nursing

    The purpose of this presentation is to showcase older adults as their own diverse group. The older adults are so unique, a one size fits all answer doesnt fit. To successfully transform nurses working with older adults, a shift to being inclusive in all things diverse needs to occur to meet the needs of this diverse Silver Tsunami. Older adults need nurses to be culturally competent to serve their needs. The target audience of this presentation is nurse educators in clinical and classroom settings for student nurses. These future nurses will be caring for the Silver Tsunami and need to see their diversity.

    Time:

    Title: Experiences of university of limpopo learner nurses during experiential learning in clinical setting of limpopo province

    Lekhuleni Masamo
    University of Limpopo, South Africa

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    Biography

    Lekhuleni Masamo
    University of Limpopo, South Africa

    Employed at University of Limpopos Department of Nursing Science as professor. Qualifications: MA Cur and PhD,Registered Nurse Registered Midwife, NursingEducation, Community Nursing Science and Nursing Administration. Amember of the University Senate, chairperson of the extended Executive Team in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Limpopo.Supervisor and external assessor of PhD theses and Masters dissertations at various Universities in South Africa.Reviewer of articles for national and international accreditedjournals.Published 43 articles on nursing education and nursing practice, presenter at national and international conferences.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Lekhuleni Masamo
    University of Limpopo, South Africa

    Background The goal of undergraduate nursing education is to provide opportunities for learner to become professional nurses who acquired competency in cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills. Teaching in higher education does not solely concern learner nurses ability to recall or reproduce information rather it concerns altering their understanding regarding the provision of quality patient care. The study aimed to explore the experiences of learner nurses during experiential learning in the clinical setting of Limpopo province. A qualitative phenomenological research design was used. The population comprised all learner nurses registered for a four-year degree at the University of Limpopo. Purposive sampling was used to select 48 learner nurses who participated in the focus group interviews for data collection. Teschs open coding method was used for data analysis. Ethical clearance was obtained from the University Ethics Committee. Findings Five themes emerged from data analysis: attitudes of professional nurses in hospital, initial clinical anxiety, opportunities for learning, difficulty in correlation of theory and practice and good versus bad experiences. Conclusions Experiences of learner nurses in clinical setting provide opportunity to develop an effective clinical teaching strategy in nursing education. The main objective of this study was to explore the experiences of learner nurses regarding their learning experiences in the clinical settings. Recommendations Professional nurses should be encouraged on clinical teaching of learner nurses as part of their teaching function. Quality improvement strategies should be applied in the clinical settingto enhance correlation of theory and practice.

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    Title: Flipping the classroom; Using technology to enhance nursing skills

    Nancy Chernak
    Nazareth College Rochester, USA

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    Biography

    Nancy Chernak
    Nazareth College Rochester, USA

    Nancy Chernak is the Clinical Program Director at Nazareth College Nursing Department, a small liberal arts college in upstate New York. Nancy is the director of the clinical nursing at Nazareth, starting with attainment of basic nursing skills and continuing throughout the nursing program. Nancy graduated from the University of Rochester with a masters degree in pediatric nursing.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Nancy Chernak
    Nazareth College Rochester, USA

    Technology is used to maximize student lab time and enhance student awareness of their own learning needs. Youtube, as well as professional nursing videos, is accessed by students from home who then come into lab to practice basic nursing skills. The students use smart phones, as well as I-Pads, etc., to record themselves demonstrating a basic nursing skill set. Students complete a self-evaluation and use google drive to submit the videos for instructor evaluation. This allows for the student to watch themselves and make corrections, and instructors can easily point out areas for improvement (using the time-stamp for clarity). This reduces the time that the lab is occupied by testing, making the lab available at all times for students to practice and video. This also has led to student satisfaction (one instruction watches all of one type of video which makes inter-rater reliability a non-issue) and students also report re-watching their own videos throughout the curriculum to help reinforce the skill. As a final evaluation, students are given a patient scenario with provider orders and record themselves caring for the patient. The videos can be reviewed by one or more instructor to evaluate student competency.

    Time:

    Title: Experiences of indigenous student nurse in dealing with death and dying in clinical area

    David Mphuthi
    University of South Africa, South Africa

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    Biography

    David Mphuthi
    University of South Africa, South Africa

    David Mphuthi Current PhD candidate with North West University (SA) and has completed M.Cur, B.Cur (Adm et Ed), Dip. Nephrology, RN. David is a PhD scholar in Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS) also a lecturer in the Department of Health Studies, University of South Africa. David has published an article in the Journal of Renal Nursing in 2013.



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    Abstract

    David Mphuthi
    University of South Africa, South Africa

    The purpose of this study was to explore first year indigenous student nurses’ experiences of encounters with death and dying of a patient during clinical practice so as to make recommendations on increase support for first year student nurses. Qualitative research which was explorative, descriptive and contextual was conducted. Data collection was done using in-depth unstructured interview. Nine participants were interviewed and data was analysed following thematic analysis approach. The findings revealed that lack of experience, emotional trauma, low self-esteem and nutritional disorder are the outcomes of dealing with death and dying of patients for first year student nurses. Negative attitudes of clinical professionals, shortage of staff and congested block programme were identified as some aspects worsening the situation. Incidental learning that occurs with negative experience encountered was also identified as one of the experiences of the participants. The findings show the need for review of curriculum for first year student nurses and the need for change of attitudes of clinical professionals nurses so that they are able to mentor students. The above findings can also be attributed to high attrition rate amongst the first year nursing students as they feel overwhelmed by their experience. This can be attributed to the indigenous believe systems about death and dying. Key Concepts First year student nurse, indigenous, death, dying, encounter, clinical practice

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    Title: Seeing through the eyes of the beholder

    Geraldine Marrocco
    Yale University, USA

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    Biography

    Geraldine Marrocco
    Yale University, USA

    Geraldine Marrocco is an Associate Professor & an adult nurse practitioner. Her doctoral degree in education is from Teacher’s College/Columbia University. She is particularly interested in the constructiveness theory to achieve transformational learning, incorporating the use of learning with technology. She promotes interprofessional learning with Yale School of Medicine. She is a member of Connecticut’s State Board of Nurse Examiners. She received 2 major awards from Yale providing funding for using technology in learning. Her research interests include methods to achieve transformational learning in education as well as policy and leadership in advanced practice. She owns & manages a primary care practice in Trumbull Connecticut.



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    Abstract

    Geraldine Marrocco
    Yale University, USA

    A key element in the conducting the comprehensive physical comprehensive health assessment is the patient interview when the provider elicits information from the patient to help guide in determining the health status as well as to discover health issues. Technologies that allow the student to view patient interviews from the patient’s perspective may enhance interviewing techniques and promote therapeutic interview behaviors. We report the results of a program for nurse practitioner students who conducted interviews with standardized patients (SP). Each standardized patient presented with routine health issues, however, each was instructed to hold on to a “secret”, a health issue of great concern. The importance of the “secret” was to determine if the student implemented interview techniques that probed and prodded for additional information. Each SP gave some hints through their responses or their body language that something was being withheld. The expert interviewer would easily pick these cues up in any interview. The standardized patient wore a pair of glasses that had a camera fixed to the frame. This optical head mounted device allowed the standardized patient to videotape the student interview from a distance of no more than 18”. When the interview was completed, the student responded to 4 open ended reflective questions on their perceived performance. The student was then asked to view the videotape and after viewing the tape, they were asked to reflect and respond to 12 open ended reflectivequestions.There was no opportunity to examine the perception of the standardized patient, however, when replicating this project, it was suggested that there would be rich data including their perspective. In conclusion, the opportunity for students to gain insight and reflect on their interviewing skills provided each with a life long learning experience.

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    Title: Facilitating the integration of caring for the cancer survivor in undergraduate nursing education

    Mary Dietmann
    Sacred Heart University, USA

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    Biography

    Mary Dietmann
    Sacred Heart University, USA



    Abstract
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    Mary Dietmann
    Sacred Heart University, USA

    the care of the cancer survivor in undergraduate nursing programs. To identify barriers and facilitators to the inclusion of cancer survivorship content in undergraduate nursing programs. Research Approach: Qualitative, descriptive. Setting: Naturalistic settings at the choice of the participant (diner or restaurant). Participants:14 baccalaureate nursing faculty from 2 northeastern states, representing 6 schools of nursing. Methodologic Approach:Face-to-face semi structured interviews with open-ended questions. Findings:Nursing faculty believe cancer survivorship care belongs in undergraduate nursing programs, but identify a gap in their curriculum regarding the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of the cancer survivor. Only 14% of participants integrated all stages of survivorship when planning classroom and clinical learning experiences. Faculty identified barriers and facilitators for including survivorship in curricula. Interpretation:Nursing faculty require education on the current definition of cancer survivorship and the needs of survivors during the acute, extended, and permanent stages of survivorship. Implications for Nursing:A significant gap in the education of nursing students on cancer survivorship was confirmed. Nursing faculty believe that nursing students should be educated on survivorship care but teaching practices are not consistent with this belief. A revision of current undergraduate nursing curricula regarding what is essential content for prelicensure BSN student is recommended. There is a need to increase opportunities for interprofessional collaboration between nursing students and other health care professions. Key Words: Cancer Survivorship; Nursing Education; Nursing Education and Cancer Survivorship; Teaching Cancer Survivorship

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    Title: Cultural competence of faculty teaching in baccalaureate degree nursing programs in Georgia

    Shirley A. McArthur
    Georgia State University Perimeter College, USA

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    Biography

    Shirley A. McArthur
    Georgia State University Perimeter College, USA

    Dr. Shirley A. McArthur has been an Assistant Professor in Nursing at Georgia State University Perimeter College since 2016. Prior to this position, Shirley was Clinical Nursing Instructor for several universities in metropolitan Georgia, and been teaching in nursing programs since 1996. Teaching a variety of clinical courses in BSN and Accelerated BSN programs, she has consistently integrated cultural competence through the clinical settings with students. She received her MSN from University of Alaska-Anchorage in Nursing Science and her BSN from the University of the District of Columbia. She obtained her PhD from Capella University in 2014.



    Abstract
  • Sessions:
    Nursing care and patient satisfaction
    Perinatal, pregnancy and midwifery

    Time:

    Title: Emotional intelligence: Crucial to quality nursing care and patient safety

    Maria Dolores B. Mangubat
    St. Joseph's College, USA

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    Biography

    Maria Dolores B. Mangubat
    St. Joseph's College, USA

    Iam a Registered Nurse, Clinical Nurse Specialist licensed and certified in New York State, nationally certified as CCRN and ACNS-BC. Currently, an Associate Professor at St. Joseph’s College, NY. I earned my Doctor of Education degree from Teachers College, Columbia University. I worked as Classroom and Clinical Educator in various schools, colleges, universities, and hospitals in the Philippines, Canada, and the United States. I held several administrative and managerial positions in different specialty units in NY hospitals. I was a former Clinical Preceptor of graduate nursing students in Nursing Informatics, Management and Education.



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    Maria Dolores B. Mangubat
    St. Joseph's College, USA

    Description Emotional intelligence (EI) is one personal characteristic that is increasingly referred to as having an impact in nursing. It is suggested that EI is important for effective practice, particularly with respect to providing quality nursing care. This systematic review explores what is meant by EI, discusses ways to develop emotional competencies, explores ways in which EI might be usefully applied in enhancing the quality of nursing care, and describes how an emotionally intelligent nurse can effectively improve the work environment which affects provision of quality care to patients. It is crucial to nurses how they control and manage their emotions. From extensive research conducted by Goleman and his associates, and by The Hay Group of Boston, emotional competence has been found to matter twice as much as intelligence quotient and technical skill combined in producing superior job performance. Also, nursing literature shows widespread support for EI as central to nursing practice. Nurses should be able to regulate their own emotions for the sake of their patients. It is having supportive and positive work environment that help nurses to alleviate their stress in managing their own and others’ emotions at the same time. Nurses must know themselves well and will be able to react and respond appropriately in problem situations. Good relationships with others are shown by managing relationship and social awareness commonly called “social radar”. Conclusion: It is very important to follow the EI framework consisting of the two components: the ability to understand and manage oneself and the ability to connect and react well to others. Having these qualities, nurses may create a healthy, safe, and productive environment which contributes to the delivery of a quality nursing care and safe patient outcome.

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    Title: Assessment of chronic disease patients views of their care and treatment

    Hediye Arslan Ozkan
    Yeditepe University, Turkey

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    Biography

    Hediye Arslan Ozkan
    Yeditepe University, Turkey



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    Hediye Arslan Ozkan
    Yeditepe University, Turkey

    Introduction: According to the World Health Organization, chronic diseases are defined as slow progressing, incurable by medical interventions, long-term, require periodic follow-ups and support care in order to reduce the severity of the disease andenhanceone’s physical functions and autonomyfortheir care management. Chronic diseases cause major changes andchallenges in patients’ daily life as a result ofcontinuousobservations, long-term follow-ups and care requirements, irreversible pathologies, persistent inadequacies or limitations of movement.In addition, chronically ill individuals become a financial burden to their family and society. For this reason, it is of utmost importance that chronic disease management is strengthened not only for the treatment of the disease but also for patients gaining self-management skills. Objective:This study was conducted to evaluate the perception ofpatients with chronic diseases regarding the treatment and care services they receivedand to identify the factors that impeded this careprocess. Methods: The sample of the study consisted of 191 volunteers with chronic illnesses who were treated in public and private hospitals in February, March and April 2017. “The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care -Patient Form" and "Patient Information Form" were filled with face-to-face interview method. The data were evaluated by Cronbach alpha, mean, percent and Pearson correlation analyzes using the SPSS 24 packet program. Results: In the study, the mean age of the sample group was 66.02 ± 15.57 (min: 21, max: 95 years), 52.4% were male, 47.6% were female, 74.9% were married, 43.5% were primary school graduates, 47.1% received care support and 99% had health insurance. 49.7% of the participants had diabetes mellitus, 17.8% had hypertension and 12% had heart disease. The examination in this study revealed that the 3 most common problems in continuity of treatment and care for chronic diseases; 36.6% were unable to manage the sypmtoms and complications, 12% were regular follow-up incompetencies and lack of self-care, and 10.5% were the stress of living with thediseases for life. The participants were asked what would reduce the burden of their treatment and care, 36.1% of the responses were reduced complications, 20.9% full recovery from the illness and 11.5% adequate information and education. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care scale, subscale means weredetermined as following: Patient Participation (Items 1-3) 3.89 ± 1.23, Decision Making (Items 4-6) 3.86 ± 1.03, Objective Determination (Items 7-11) 3.54 ± 1.31, Problem Solving (Items 12-15) 3.80 ± 1.14, Monitoring / Coordination (Items 16-20) 3.40 ± 1.23. The overall scale mean was (1-20 items) 3.65 ± 1.44. Cronbach alpha of the scale was analysed which was .93. The determination of higher subscale scores in patient participation, decision making and problem solving reflects that the participants were more satisfiedin chronic disease care. Conclusion: In recent years,the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases has revealed the importance of chronic disease management which requires planning of treatment and follow-up, improvement of care results and quality, and patient satisfaction. The services provided to individuals with chronic illnesses should be assessed regularlyso that the quality is maintained and improved. When the health care services provided to participants were evaluatedin the survey, it was observed that the results were above the average scale score. Non the less, it was also appeared that individuals with chronic disease should be strengthened byeducating them regularly for management of regular follow-upsandcomplications. Key words: Chronic Care, Health Management, Self Care, Nursing

    Time:

    Title: Impediments of optimal midwifery experiential learning environments in maternity units of public hospitals of limpopo province, south africa

    Thopola Magdeline Kefilwe
    University of Limpopo, South Africa

    Biography
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    Biography

    Thopola Magdeline Kefilwe
    University of Limpopo, South Africa

    Dr Magdeline Kefilwe Thopola, teaches midwifery, supervising research to undergraduates and Masters Dissertations. Qualifications: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Mcur, B Cur: Nursing Education, Community Nursing Science, Occupational Health Nursing, Nursing Administration, Registered Midwife and Registered Nurse. Midwifery specialist, initiated advanced midwifery training in Ga-Rankuwa Nursing College. PhD Title “An evidence-based model for enhancing optimal midwifery practice environment in maternity units of public hospitals, Limpopo province. Presented research papers nationally and internationally. Published 13 midwifery articles in accredited journals. Reviewer of articles for publications in accredited journals. Served as faculty advisor of First Africa Cohort of Maternal-Child-Health Care Leadership Academy, 2013-2015.



    Abstract

    Time:

    Title: Selected Menstrual Hygiene Management Indicators among Ghanaian Women of Reproductive Age.

    Easmon Otupiri
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-School if Public Health, Ghana

    Biography
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    Biography

    Easmon Otupiri
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-School if Public Health, Ghana

    Dr Easmon Otupiri is a public health specialist/field epidemiologist at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-School of Public Health with a special interest in newborn health, maternal health, reproductive health, family planning and child survival. He has over three decades of work experience in Public Health in developing countries.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Easmon Otupiri
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-School if Public Health, Ghana

    Background: Menstruation is a normal, recurrent, physiological event, experienced by most women of reproductive age. Menstruation and menstrual hygiene issues have not been adequately addressed in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed at profiling selected menstrual hygiene indicators among women of reproductive age in Ghana: access to sanitary facilities, sanitary products used, and methods of disposal of used sanitary materials. Methods: Secondary data analysis was used - data from the PMA2020 Ghana 2014 survey; a nationally representative survey of households in Ghana. Results: In Ghana 58% of women aged 15-49 years lacked access to an appropriate sanitary facility where they could change, wash, dry or dispose off used sanitary products. Significant differences were recorded when the women were compared by political region of residence – women residing in the Upper West region were nearly five times more likely to lack access when compared with women in the Ashanti region (aOR=4.68, p-value=0.001, 95%CI: 2.68 – 8.18) The use of disposable sanitary pads was fairly high (67%). Even after adjusting for co-variates, when compared with women from poor homes, women from wealthier homes were significantly more likely to have used a sanitary product. Women in rural areas of Ghana did not differ significantly from those in the urban areas in the use of sanitary products. Less than half (45%) of the respondents disposed off their used sanitary products into waste bins or burnt it; rural residents had significantly lower odds of proper disposal. When compared with women in the Ashanti region, women in three regions were significantly less likely to have properly disposed off their products. Wealth, education level and age also significantly influenced proper disposal of sanitary products. Conclusions: There should be concerted efforts towards having appropriate policy and adequate action on the under-addressed issues of menstrual hygiene such as lack of access to sanitary facilities among others.

    Sessions:
    Community health nursing and Public Health
    Recent advances in nursing research

    Time:

    Title: Using prayer and yoga to reduce stress among Hispanics with chronic conditions

    Sandra Benavides-Vaello
    Montana State University, USA

    Biography
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    Biography

    Sandra Benavides-Vaello
    Montana State University, USA

    Dr. Benavides-Vaello is an associate professor in the College of Nursing at Montana State University-Bozeman, and Director (Department Chairperson) for the Missoula Nursing Campus. The focus of her research is the sociocultural experiences (food practices, health status monitoring, cultural values and norms, behavioral health concerns), social determinants, and self-care of low income Hispanics with chronic conditions. She is an international scholar, researcher and the author of numerous peer reviewed scholarly publications and co-authored chapters in two books: U.S.-Mexico Border Health: Issues For Regional And Migrant Populations, and AIDS Crossing Borders, The Spread Of HIV Among Migrant Latinos. Dr. Benavides-Vaello holds a bachelor’s in nursing and doctorate in nursing from The University of Texas, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, and a Master of Public Affairs (focus on health policy) also from The University of Texas, LBJ School of Public Affairs, Austin, Texas.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Sandra Benavides-Vaello
    Montana State University, USA

    The purpose of this pilot and formative study was to explore the receptivity of using prayer and yoga to reduce stress among Montana (MT) Hispanics with diabetes and/or hypertension. Stress is a known contributor to poorer diabetes and cardiovascular management. Yet, daily stress is one of the most common complaints among Hispanics with chronic conditions, including diabetes and/or hypertension. Evidence supports that meditation and/or meditative type activities such as yoga are effective in reducing stress biomarkers and positively impact metabolic and cardiovascular health.Evidence also supports that Hispanics are responsive to parish-linked services. This is not surprising since religion and health are tightly connected in most Hispanic cultures and nearly 70% Hispanics identify as being Roman Catholic, with the majority being actively involved in religious services. Thus anchoring a self-management health intervention (prayer/yoga for reducing stress) within a faith-based institution has great potential for success. In a review of the literature, no studies could be identified that combined prayer and yoga as an activity to reduce stress among Hispanics with chronic disease. The purpose of the pilot study was to specifically evaluate if using prayer and yoga could reduce stress and if the population of focus was receptive to such an approach. The pilot study involved the targeted/ recruitment of n=30 Hispanic men and women, residing in MT, with hypertension and/or diabetes. Criteria for participation in the study were: self-Identified Latino/Hispanic; adult persons 21 years and older that have diabetes or hypertension; able to speak Spanish or English languages; reside in MT; open to prayer, in the Catholic form, as part of the activity (participants were not required to be Catholic to take part, but had to be comfortable with using Catholic doctrine during the yoga activity and yoga sessions as these were held in the Catholic parishes across rural Montana; self-identified as being able to independently engage in yoga – level activity. The specific aims of the study were to: 1) Evaluate the receptivity of using a prayer/yoga session as a venue for reducing stress among Hispanics with diabetes or hypertension that reside in MT participatory action based –approach; 2) Employ the results from the pilot study to inform and aid in the design of an intervention study. The pilot study employed an exploratory descriptive (formative) methodology that used Participatory Action Research (PAR) as the guiding approach. Multi-methods were used for the gathering of data and to address the aims of this investigation. An interpretive descriptive methodology was used for the qualitative arm of the study. Data from debriefing groups (post yoga), participant observation, and field notes were the methods for collecting qualitative data. The quantifiable (quantitative) arm of the study used a descriptive approach and data sources were the pre/post stress surveys [Stress scale and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-4)] and demographic information collected from all participants. To characterize the study group, demographic characteristics and key variables for all participants were summarized for the group. These attributes included age, gender, acculturation (primary language spoken), and stress experience.

    Time:

    Title: Appropriateness and timeliness of care seeking for complications of pregnancy and childbirth in rural Ethiopia: a case study of the Maternal and Newborn Health in Ethiopia Partnership.

    Lynn M. Sibley
    Emory University, USA

    Biography
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    Biography

    Lynn M. Sibley
    Emory University, USA

    Lynn Sibley is Professor in the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University and holds a joint appointment in the Rollins School of Public Health’s Department of Global Health and affiliate appointment in the Department of Anthropology. Her career has been devoted to reducing maternal and newborn mortality across low resource settings by focusing on community-level formative and implementation research and programming. Other professional activities include advisor/consultant on community-level maternal and newborn health to well-respected global organizations including the World Health Organization, UNICEF, International Confederation of Midwives, United States Agency for International Development and National Institutes of Health.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Lynn M. Sibley
    Emory University, USA

    Background. The USAID/University Research Co., L.L.C. Translating Research into Action Project’s Systematic Documentation of Illness Recognition and Appropriate Care Seeking for Maternal and Newborn Complications launched in 2014. The project used a common protocol involving descriptive mixed-methods case studies of community projects in five low- and middle-income countries, including Ethiopia. In this paper we present the Maternal and Newborn Health in Ethiopia Partnership (MaNHEP) case study. Methods. Methods included secondary analysis of data from MaNHEP’s 2010 baseline and 2012 end line surveys, health program inventory and facility mapping to contextualize care seeking; and illness narratives to identify factors influencing illness recognition and care seeking. Analyses used descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, multivariate logistic regression and thematic content analysis. Results. Maternal illness awareness increased between 2010 and 2012 for major obstetric complications. After 2012, the Ministry of Health introduced nationwide initiatives to improve the supply and demand for maternal and newborn health care. By 2014, care seeking for perceived maternal illness increased by 26% and occurred more often compared with care seeking for newborn illness (64% vs. 38%)--a difference notable in cases of culminating death (100% vs. 31%). Most families sought care < 1 day of illness recognition. Facilitating factors were health extension worker advice and ability to refer upward, and health facility proximity; impeding factors were time of day, weather, road conditions, distance, poor communications, lack of transportation or money, perceived spiritual or physical vulnerability of the mother and newborn, postnatal restrictions on movement, and preference for traditional care. Some families sought care despite disrespectful, poor quality care. Conclusions. Improvements in illness recognition and care seeking observed during MaNHEP and reinforced through new government initiatives can be expected to continue if concerted efforts are made to reduce identified barriers and improve quality of care.

    Time:

    Title: Effect of Family Empowerment on the Quality of life of School-Aged Children with Asthma Attending Pediatric Outpatient Clinics of Tanta University and El-Mehalla El- Koubra Chest Hospital

    Latiefa Fouda
    Tanta University, Egypt

    Biography
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    Biography

    Latiefa Fouda
    Tanta University, Egypt



    Abstract
    Sessions:
    Geriatric nursing
    Cancer nursing
    Heart and Cardiovascular nursing

    Time:

    Title: Quality of chest compressions and compliance by healthcare professionals with real-time audiovisual feedback during in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Kristina Schildmeijer
    Linneaus University, Sweden

    Biography
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    Biography

    Kristina Schildmeijer
    Linneaus University, Sweden



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Kristina Schildmeijer
    Linneaus University, Sweden

    Introduction: A high quality of chest compressions, e.g. sufficient depth (5-6cm) andrate (100-120 per minute), has been associated with survival. The patient's underlay affects chest compression depth. Depth and rate can be assessed by feedback systems to guide rescuers during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Aim: To describe the quality of chest compressions by healthcare professionals using real-time audiovisual feedback during in-hospital CPR. Method: An observational descriptive study was performed including 63 cardiac arrest events with a resuscitation attempt. Data files were recorded by Zoll AED Pro, and reviewed by RescueNet Code Review software. The events were analyzed according to depth, rate, quality of chest compressions and underlay. Results: Across events, 12.7% (median) of the compressions had a depth of 5-6 cm. Compression depth of > 6 cm was measured in 70.1% (median). The underlay could be identified from the electronic patient records in 54 events. The median compression depth was 4.5 cm (floor) and 6.7 cm (mattress). Across events, 57.5% (median) of the compressions were performed with a median frequency of 100-120 compressions per minute and the most common problem was a compression rate of < 100 (median = 22.3%). Conclusions: Chest compression quality was poor according to the feedback system. However, the distribution of compression depth with regard to underlay points towards overestimation of depth when treating patients on a mattress. The audiovisual feedback devices ought to be further developed. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of the strengths and weaknesses of their devices.

    Time:

    Title: The development of community care for enhancing the quality of life in disabled older people

    Tassana Choowattanapakorn
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

    Biography
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    Biography

    Tassana Choowattanapakorn
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Tassana Choowattanapakorn
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

    Background: Disabilities are a range of impactsfrom chronic illness that are common in older people. The limited mobility results in declining activity and an increasingdependency. Rehabilitation is then required to increase the independency and quality of life. Method: Participation action research was used to develop rehabilitation care for the disabled in the community. A sub-district with seven communities in a province nearby to Bangkok was chosen. The population of 6047 people included 1001 people aged 60 years and above. From the screening of the health center, 15 people were categorizedas disabled, while 97 hadlimited mobility. Questionnaire-basedinterviews of their daily activity, symptoms of depression, nutrition (Mini-Nutrition Assessment,section 1),risk of falling (Thai FRAT),risk of getting pressure sores (Braden Scale) and their self-perceived health status were taken to confirm their level of ability. Focus-groups were conducted to gather information from family members. Results: More than half (61.9%) of the subjects were female, with an average age of 73.4 years. Most people were independent (86.6%), with only three people being shown to be highly dependent. Nonetheless, they perceived themselves as having a good (67%) or moderate (33%) health status. The focus groups revealed that family members and village health volunteers mainly took care of the disabled, and they expressed a lack of confidencein the rehabilitation care provision. The teaching of chronic diseases and rehabilitation strategies was developed, where caregivers were educated and trained by researchers. Most of the trainees had more confidence and satisfaction with their improved rehabilitation skills. Conclusion:Continual rehabilitation training is essential to sustain the required knowledge and skills for caregivers of the disabledelderly in the community, and is also a critical requirement to keep disabled people in their family and community. Key words: Disability, rehabilitation, care

    Time:

    Title: A case study on survival & quality of life of a patient with CA Cervix

    Rekha Jaiprakash Ogale
    RAK College of Nursing, Saudi Arabia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Rekha Jaiprakash Ogale
    RAK College of Nursing, Saudi Arabia



    Abstract

    Time:

    Title: Risk factors and prevalence of facility aquired decubitus ulcers in onclogy patients

    Maen Aljezawi
    Al al-Bayt University, Jordon

    Biography
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    Biography

    Maen Aljezawi
    Al al-Bayt University, Jordon

    Maen aljezawi is an assistant professor of nursing at Al al-Bayt University/ faculty of nursing. I have earned my bachelor's degree and mater degree in nursing science for Jordan University of science and Technology, my PhD in nursing science was from De Montforte Unversity-UK. In Academia I have taught a number of nursing courses like community health nursing, gerontological nursing and psychiatric nursing. In the research area I am interested in epidemiological studies and exploring health phenomena



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Maen Aljezawi
    Al al-Bayt University, Jordon

    Back ground: : Although a plethora of studies have been reported in literature exploring decubitus ulcers prevalence and risk factors , very few focused on cancer patients as being a special risk group. Aim:to explore prevalence and risk factors of decubitus ulcers in cancer patients in Jordan Method:A cross-sectional multicenter study was conducted using the European decubitus Ulcers Advisory Panel Methodology in five hospitals in Jordan.All cancer patients matching the study selection criteria were recruited conveniently.Patients' skin was examined and risk of decubitus ulcers was assessed .Descriptive and univariate analysis was performed on different study variables. Multivariate analysis using a special algorithm ("purposeful selection macro") was employed to explore the independent association between a number of risk factors and decubitus ulcers. Results:This study included a 310 cancer patients, age mean was 54.65 ± 16.65 years, 169 patients (54%) were males, The general prevalence of decubitus ulcers was 16.5% (6.9% when grade 1 was excluded.Results from multivariate analysis showed that:immobility, presence of co-morbidites, age older than 40 years and hypoalbuminemia were independently associated with the development of decubitus ulcers. Conclusion:This study is the first of its kind that was conducted in Jordan. Results from current work support the previous evidence from literature for some risk factors to be associated with decubitus ulcers. However, the current work also found decubitus ulcers to be associated with a younger age (the age cohort above 40 years) than has previously been reported.Further guidelines are needed for prevention and treatment in such a vulnerable patient group.

    Time:

    Title: Lifestyle and dietary factors and prostate cancer risk: A multicentre case-control study

    Mohammad Al Qadire
    Al Al-Bayt University, Jordon

    Biography
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    Biography

    Mohammad Al Qadire
    Al Al-Bayt University, Jordon

    Dr Mohammad Al Qadire, RN, PhD is an associate professor of oncology and palliative care nursing. He is currently the Head of Adult Healthcare department and the dean assistant for students’ affairs at Prince Salma School of Nursing/Al Al-Bayt University in Jordan. He earned his PhD in Nursing from the University of Manchester-UK. The focus of his PhD research was on implementing research findings to improve cancer pain management in Jordan. He has more than 10 years of clinical, teaching, and research experience and worked as oncology nurse, Head Nurse, and Research Assistant, he has more than 25 successful publications in a well-known international Journals in the field of Oncology Nursing and Palliative care.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Mohammad Al Qadire
    Al Al-Bayt University, Jordon

    The risk factors of prostate cancer vary among different geographical locations, cultures and ethnic groups; however, no such study has been conducted in Jordan. Hence, this study was conducted to explore the association between fruit and vegetable intake, high fat, BMI score, physical activity and the occurrence of prostate cancer among Jordanian men. A case-control study was conducted in three large referral hospitals in Jordan. The cases group comprised 165 prostate cancer patients and the control group consisted of 177 unmatched participants who had no prostate cancer. The results showed that smoking (OR= 0.32; 95% CI= 0.18 to 0.57), a history of prostate infection (OR= 0.21; 95% CI= 0.11 to 0.38), high fat intake (OR= 0.44; 95% CI= 0.23 to 0.85), and increased mean of BMI (OR= 1.08; 95% CI= 1.02 to 1.13) increased the likelihood of developing prostate cancer. High intake of fruit and vegetables (OR= 2.18, 95% CI= 1.18 to 4.02) was preventive against prostate cancer. A high fruit and vegetable intake shows a protective effect against prostate cancer, but physical activity does not. Based on this, a healthy diet and giving up smoking are recommended, as they may contribute to a reduction in the incidence of prostate cancer. More randomised clinical trials in this area are needed to strengthen the available evidence and reduce the effects of confounding variables.

    Time:

    Title: Perceptions of risk of coronary heart disease among people living with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Ali Ammouri
    The Hashemite University, Jordon

    Biography
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    Biography

    Ali Ammouri
    The Hashemite University, Jordon

    Ali Ammourin is an associate professor in the department of Nursing at The Hashemite University. He completed his PhD at University of Kansas. His Research interest is Preventive cardiology, health promotion. Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease; Risk Factor Interventions; Open Heart Surgery Management; Cardiac Rehabilitation. He published many articles in different journals.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Ali Ammouri
    The Hashemite University, Jordon

    Aims. To assess perception of risk of getting coronary heart disease, and to examine its associations with individual’s characteristics and health behaviours among Omanis with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Background. Evaluating perceptions of being at risk of getting a disease may give insight into health promotion behaviours. People with diabetes are at high risk of getting coronary heart disease. The management of diabetes mellitus should include prevention and control of coronary heart disease. Design. A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted. Methods. A convenience sample of 160 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus invited to participate in this study between November 2014 and March 2015. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed to examine associations between study variables. Results. High perception of risk of getting coronary heart disease was significantly associated with low educational level, low income, and high level of knowledge about diabetes mellitus. People with diabetes who perceived coronary heart disease as having few moderate known outcomes and consequences reported consuming healthy diet more frequently. Conclusion. Teaching people with diabetes about the risk of getting coronary heart disease is essential as it could motivate them to perform health promotion behaviours, which may assist in controlling and reducing coronary heart disease.

  • Sessions:
    Psychiatric and mental health nursing
    Paediatric Nursing

    Time:

    Title: Wanting to feel normal: An exploration of mentally disordered offender's perspectives following psychoeducation

    Steven Trenoweth
    Bournemouth University, UK

    Biography
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    Biography

    Steven Trenoweth
    Bournemouth University, UK

    Steve Trenoweth qualified as a mental health nurse in 1991 and has worked in a variety of services before entering higher education in 2003. He is currently senior academic at Bournemouth University. He has authored several chapters, articles and book in nursing and health care and is an editorial board member of the British Journal of Mental Health Nursing. He is a trustee of Project Nurture, a charitable enterprise committed to enhancing and enriching the natural and built environment for people experiencing social exclusion and mental health difficulties.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Steven Trenoweth
    Bournemouth University, UK

    The recovery approachhas been increasingly influential amongst mental health nurses in the UK (Trenoweth, Tingle and Clark 2016). The approach stresses the importance of developing a collaborative partnership with service usersbased onunderstanding the person’s subjective experience. The Repertory Grid Technique (Kelly 1955/1991) is a structured interview technique which allows the nurse tounderstand the individual’s personal frame of reference and capture how service users make sense of their world and the world around them. This also allows the nurse and service user to understand and evaluate particular health care interventions in supporting the individual on their personal recovery journey. This study explored the personal impact of a psychoeducational programme for a group of mentally disordered offenders. A purposive sample of 20 participants were selected from two secure units in a high secure hospital. Structured interviews were completed using the Repertory Grid Technique. Significant differences were apparent in three areas: have confidence to engage in groups, (z = -2.203, N = 18, p < .05);understand my own illness and how it affects me, (z = -2.203, N = 18, p < .05) and wanting to feel normal, (z = -1.997, N = 18, p < .05). Feeling normal was also associated with feeling valued,having hope, feeling confident, understanding your illness and realising others have the same problems. This study has highlighted that, following a psychoeducational programme, service users placed importance on understanding themselves and their personal world, and of feeling normal as part of their own recovery journey. This study has implications for mental health nursing practice and suggests a mechanism by which mutual understandings can be developed between the nurse and service user, revealing meaningful information for discussion and reflection and understanding the personal pathwaysfor recovery for those who have complex needs.

    Time:

    Title: Factors leading to re-admission of mental health care users at Thabamoopo psychiatric hospital of Limpopo Province, South Africa

    Jermina Kgole
    University of Limpopo, South Africa

    Biography
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    Biography

    Jermina Kgole
    University of Limpopo, South Africa

    General nursing, Midwifery, Psychiatric nursing, Community nursing, Nursing Education, BCur, BCur (HONS), Post-graduate Diplomas in Tertiary Education and Psychiatric nursing, Masters and DLitt et PHil. Facilitate Psychiatric nursing to undergraduate students. Supervises research in undergraduates, post-graduates Diploma in Primary Health Care, Masters’ students and PhD students. Serves as external assessor of dissertations and theses of Masters and Doctoral degrees. Published 29 articles in accredited journals. A member of Senior Degrees Committee, School of Health Care Sciences. Was a member of Forum of University Heads of Departments Attended conferences and presented papers provincially, nationally and internationally. A Faculty and Senate member.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Jermina Kgole
    University of Limpopo, South Africa

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors leading to re-admission of mental health care users at Thabamoopo Psychiatric Hospital, Limpopo Province. A qualitative, descriptive and exploratory research method was used. The population of the study included all mental health care users who are discharged and re-admitted in Thabamoopo Hospital and the relatives taking care of the mental health care users. Non-probability purposive sampling was used to select the twelve participants. A phenomenological research design was applied; and semi-structured interviews were used for collection of data. One-on-one interviews were conducted, of which ten were conducted with mental health care users and two with the relatives of mental health care users. The data was analysed by using Tesch’s method of analysis. The results of the study proved that re-admission of mental health care users occurred due to abuse of alcohol and cannabis and the mental health care users did not adhere to the prescribed psychotropic medications. Social problems such as family disorganisation and lack of psychological support from families proved to be factors that can lead to re-admission of mental health users to the hospital. Based on the results of the study mental health professionals should provide mental health care users and relatives with psycho-education on substance abuse and cannabis and on the importance of taking psychotropic medications as prescribed. Keywords: Readmission, mental health care user.

    Time:

    Title: Effect of psych educational intervention onthe quality of life of patients with insulin resistance syndrome

    Essmat M. Gemeay
    Tanta University, Egypt

    Biography
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    Biography

    Essmat M. Gemeay
    Tanta University, Egypt



    Abstract

    Time:

    Title: Prevalence of patient related violence against nursing officers in different units, in Teaching Hospital Karapitiya

    S.M.R.G. Godawita
    University of Ruhuna, Srilanka

    Biography
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    Biography

    S.M.R.G. Godawita
    University of Ruhuna, Srilanka



    Abstract

    Time:

    Title: Health-related quality of life in mothers with children with cancer: A systematic review

    Christiana Nicolaou
    CyprusUniversity of Technology, Cyprus

    Biography
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    Biography

    Christiana Nicolaou
    CyprusUniversity of Technology, Cyprus



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Christiana Nicolaou
    CyprusUniversity of Technology, Cyprus

    Background:Studies among parents of children with cancerhave focused on anxiety, depression, or post-traumatic stress, and less so on overall measures, such as Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Methods:Literature review in Scopus and Cinahlwith terms: mothers OR carersetc AND child* OR adolesc* etc AND cancer or oncolog* etc AND quality of life OR HRQoLetc, in 65 combinations.Selection criteria: mothers (or predominately in mixed samples), children aged<18 in active treatment (no palliative), quantitative, some measure of quality of life, comparative (e.g. population norms, or control group) or correlational, or baseline in interventions, English language, prior 2015. Results:Of237 studiesreviewed in full-text among 2184, 10 fulfilled all criteria: 6 mothersonly, 4 mixed with separate results for mothers, and additional 10with sample of predominately mothers.With the exception of a series of studies from Canada (N>400), most studies had small sample sizes (N<150). European studies originated from limited number of settings. There were single-sample correlational studies (e.g. coping, anxiety, depression, sleep quality), internal comparisons (e.g. single- vs two-parent families, time since diagnosis, or same group longitudinal,etc) or external (i.e. mothers of healthy children, or other diagnosis, or population norms).SF-36 was commonly used. In studies with external comparison, quality of life was significantly reduced amongst mothers (or parents) of children with cancer. Despite cross-national heterogeneity,in studies that the SF-36 commonly effect sizes were in the range of 0.5-1 SD for mental health and ~0.5 SD for physical health dimension. Conclusions:Physical health as well as mental health aspects of the quality of life appear affected in this vulnerable group, highlighting the need to monitor and incorporateQoL as an outcome measure inassessing the effectiveness of psychosocial

    Sessions:
    Critical Care Nursing and Emergency Nursing
    Surgical Nursing

    Time:

    Title: The case of “Dorothy”: successful treatment with fecal microbiota transplantation in the management of resistant clostridium difficile infections

    York College of Pennsylvania, USA

    Biography
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    Biography

    York College of Pennsylvania, USA



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    York College of Pennsylvania, USA

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are some of the most common healthcareassociated infections in hospitalized patients1-8 and in patients residing in nursing homes.9-11 The diagnosis and treatment of CDIs exceed an estimated 3.2 billion dollars annually in the United States2,4,11-12 with approximately 333,000 cases and 15,000 to 20,000 deaths per year.2,4,13-15 When the diarrhea becomes severe and causes complications, CDIs become life-threatening and are a significant cause of morbidity and death in hospitalized patients.1-4 There is increased incidence of severe and recurrent CDIs (RCDIs) due to a new hypervirulent strain that is less responsive to traditional medications. These patients oftentimes will be treated in an intensive care unit. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), also called fecal bacteriotherapy, is an adjunctive, cost-effective means of treatment for patients with RCDI.2,12-19 The critical care nurse must understand the importance of a balanced gut microbiome20,21 and how CDIs disrupts that balance.22-25 Furthermore, the critical care nurse must recognize the role of Fecal Microbiota Transplants in order to provide appropriate care, educate patients, and collaborate with health care professionals regarding the latest treatment options for patients with RCDI. This presentation will utilize a case report of a 69year-old woman who presented with diarrhea after being on an antibiotic for pneumonia. Status post FMT there was a complete resolution of the diarrhea after 10 hours of treatment and Dorothy reported no further diarrhea or complications. This presentation with highlight the FMT procedure, risks benefits and nursing care required.

    Time:

    Title: Efficacy of education and counseling services provided for patients undergoing obesity surgery

    Betul Guven
    KOC University, Turkey

    Biography
    χ

    Biography

    Betul Guven
    KOC University, Turkey



    Abstract
    Sessions:
    Nursing Ethics, Hospice and Palliative care
    Nephrology nursing

    Time:

    Title: Analysis of depression levels in hemodialysis patients by assessing the effect of dialysis on quality of life

    Ozlem Yazici
    Okan University, Turkey

    Biography
    χ

    Biography

    Ozlem Yazici
    Okan University, Turkey



    Abstract

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